⏩Main part

  1. 🔁Revision
  2. 📋Homework check (optional)
  3. 👨‍🏫Presentation
  4. ✍️Practice

⏩Main part

 
The main part of the lesson should include a smooth transition to the main topic of the lesson through the short review of the material of the previous one. The activities chosen by the teacher should correspond to the communicative aim of the lesson and follow the timing prescribed for a communicative lesson.

1 min Simple game
This part enables you to come up to the material of the lesson and review the material of the previous one. Use simple games, such as “Mime and guess”, “What is missing? (with the cards)”, “Odd one out”, “Listen and draw”, etc.
The games can be:

  • on screen (in the slide or a screenshot on a whiteboard)
  • using real objects (cards in the hands of a teacher, drawing on paper, involving the toys and things around the student
  • verbal questions (linked to revision of the topic)

Here are some variants of games you can use. Choose 1-2 games.
The examples are given on the topic “School”:

What is missing?
Description: The student has to identify the card or image that has disappeared from the screen
Instructions: The teacher selects 5 images of key vocabulary from the topic.
The teacher points to the objects and encourages the student to repeat after him, object by object.
Teacher: “Look! What’s this? A pencil!”
Student: “A pencil.”
Teacher: “A pen!”
Student: “A pen.”
Teacher: “A ruler!”
Student: “A ruler.”
Teacher: “A rubber!”
Student: “A rubber.”
Teacher: “A marker!”
Student: “A marker.”
The teacher reviews the objects.
Teacher: “Can you see? A pencil, a pen, a book, a rubber and a ruler! Good!”The teacher instructs the student to close his eyes. The teacher closes his eyes with hands so that the student can copy the gesture.
Teacher: “Now, close your eyes!”The teacher removes an object from the screen (click forward if you are using the AllRight slides in the classroom).
The teacher instructs the student to open his eyes and guess which object is missing using surprised intonation.
Teacher: “Open your eyes! What is missing?”
The teacher helps the student to guess if needed by pronouncing the first sound of the word:
Teacher: “P…p…pe…”
Student: “Pen!”
Teacher: “It is a pen!”
Student: “It is a pen!”

The teacher reveals the missing object (click forward if you are using the AllRight slides in the classroom).
The teacher repeats the procedure with all 5 words.

Notes: The game is often included in AllRight lessons in the classroom. In this case the teacher uses the interface of the slide.
The game can also be added to the lesson as an extra activity. In this case the game can be played with:

  • Real flashcards (the teacher needs to stick them to a whiteboard behind himself)
  • Toys or real objects (the objects can be placed on the table in front of the teacher)
  • Using digital images ( a. the teacher can use a powerpoint presentation to animate the objects appear and disappear; b. the teacher can use a picture with all 5 objects on it and put it to the online whiteboard in AllRight classroom; to imitate disappearing the teacher can draw upon an object he wants to close from the student and then click “back” to undo the drawing and reveal the object.
Listen and circle
Description: The student has to follow the teacher’s instructions and circle the object on the screen.
Instructions: The teacher selects 5 images of key vocabulary from the topic.
The teacher points to the objects and encourages the student to repeat after him, object by object.
Teacher: “Look! What’s this? A pencil!”
Student: “A pencil.”
Teacher: “A pen!”
Student: “A pen.”
Teacher: “A ruler!”
Student: “A ruler.”
Teacher: “A rubber!”
Student: “A rubber.”
Teacher: “A marker!”
Student: “A marker.”
The teacher encourages the student to listen and follow the instructions.
The teacher helps the student to find and click on the “pencil” tool in the classroom by drawing an arrow above the “pencil” tool on the toolbar in the classroom.
Teacher: Look! Take a pencil!The teacher names an object and the student circles in with the pencil tool in the classroom. To help the student understand what “circle” is, the teacher draws a circle in the air with his forefinger.
Teacher: Listen! Circle the pen! Circle the pen!
Student: *circles*
Teacher: A pen!
Student: A pen!
Teacher: It’s a pen!
Student: It’s a pen!
The teacher repeats the procedure with all 5 objects on the screen.

*For more advanced students, the game can be varied by asking the student to circle different objects with different colour:
Teacher: Circle the pen orange, please!
Student: *circles*
Teacher: A pen!
Student: A pen!
Teacher: An orange pen!
Student: An orange pen!
Teacher: It’s an orange pen!
Student: It’s an orange pen!

Notes: The game is often included in AllRight lessons in the classroom. In this case the teacher uses the interface of the classroom (the objects are already suggested on the slide and the student uses the pencil tool from the toolbar.

The game can also be added to the lesson as an extra activity. In this case the game can be played using a prepared digital image with 5 objects illustrating topical vocabulary. The teacher places the image on the online whiteboard in AllRight classroom; the student uses the “pencil” tool from the toolbar to draw.

Listen and draw
Description: The student has to listen to the teacher’s instructions and draw an object.
Can be done both on screen or on real paper.
Instructions: On screen:
The teacher explains to the student how to click on the pencil tool and choose a colour.
Teacher: Look! A pencil! Click! *draw an arrow above the button with the pencil to show the student where it is*
Student: *clicks on the pencil tool* OK!
Teacher: Let’s draw! I say, you draw! *draws a random line on the screen; points to his own mouth then points to the student and performs drawing*
Teacher: Draw a pencil! A pencil!
Teacher: Draw a book! A book!
On paper:
The teacher asks the student to prepare a piece of paper and a pencil or several crayons.
Teacher: Have you got paper? *show a piece of paper*
Teacher: Have you got a pencil? *show a pencil*
Teacher: Let’s draw! I say, you draw! *draws a random line on the screen; points to his own mouth then points to the student and performs drawing*
Teacher: Draw a pencil! A pencil!
Teacher: Draw a book! A book!
Notes: The game is often included in AllRight lessons in the classroom.
The game can be varied by adding a certain colour to the drawing instruction: “Draw a red pencil! A red pencil!”