Tips to Improve Your Trial (and paid) Lessons

Hello teachers!

As summer is approaching, you might find yourself having a few less trial lessons, so let’s try and make each one count 😊

Based on the feedback from our trial students in the past few months, we’d like to offer some tips based on the the most frequent comments made by students.

  1. Please don’t say anything negative about the company. Negative comments about the system, platform or materials reflect poorly on the company and will most likely lead to the student not enrolling in your lessons. Please try to remain positive and direct your complaints to members of staff, rather than students.
  2. Find ways to keep your lessons fresh and exciting. We understand teaching the same few trial lessons over and over again can start to because a bit monotonous for you, but you should keep in mind that this is likely the first time the student has seen the material. We are developing new trial lessons which should be available soon, but in the mean time we hope you will find ways to keep the material fresh and interesting for you and your students.
  3. Maintain a “student-centred” approach towards teaching. This seems counter-intuitive, but modern teaching methodology is moving away from teachers instructing lessons, and towards students leading lessons with their preferences and ideas. Also keep up to date with your students interests and wishes for learning, and also ask them about preferences throughout the lessons. Maybe they would prefer to listen to you read, instead of them always reading, or maybe they would prefer to play a game instead of singing. If you don’t ask, you’ll never know!
  4. Give constructive feedback, both during and after the lesson. Error correction and constructive feedback during lessons is a valuable tool which shows students and parents that you know your stuff, and that you have your students’ best interests at heart. This, paired with praise and rewards (when deserved) make for a great teaching environment and motivates students to come to class and perform well. Including detailed and personal feedback after trial lessons can be a deciding factor for some students to see if the two of you shared a connection during your lesson, so it’s important to take it seriously, and never say that a student is not suitable for our school.
  5. Stay positive! We know times are tough right now, which makes it more important than ever to offer a fun and positive outlet for our students. We expect that our teachers will take care of themselves by taking rest when needed to be able to maintain high energy levels and a positive mood throughout the day.

In addition to this, as All Right is welcoming more new students from Spain, Italy, and Poland, we’ve made a cheat sheet of common phrases to use during your lessons. You can copy and paste these onto your slides, or if you’re brave, try and say them! 💪🏻

You can download our cheat sheet for phrases in different languages here.

If you haven’t already, you can take our free training courses here.

Happy teaching!