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⏩Main part

  1. 🔁Revision
  2. 📋Homework check (optional)
  3. 👨‍🏫Presentation
  4. ✍️Practice

⏩Main part

 
The main part of the lesson should include a smooth transition to the main topic of the lesson through the short review of the material of the previous one. The activities chosen by the teacher should correspond to the communicative aim of the lesson and follow the timing prescribed for a communicative lesson.

1 min Simple game
This part enables you to come up to the material of the lesson and review the material of the previous one. Use simple games, such as “Mime and guess”, “What is missing? (with the cards)”, “Odd one out”, “Listen and draw”, etc.
The games can be:

  • on screen (in the slide or a screenshot on a whiteboard)
  • using real objects (cards in the hands of a teacher, drawing on paper, involving the toys and things around the student
  • verbal questions (linked to revision of the topic)

Here are some variants of games you can use. Choose 1-2 games.
The examples are given on the topic “School”:

What is missing?
Description: The student has to identify the card or image that has disappeared from the screen
Instructions: The teacher selects 5 images of key vocabulary from the topic.
The teacher points to the objects and encourages the student to repeat after him, object by object.
Teacher: “Look! What’s this? A pencil!”
Student: “A pencil.”
Teacher: “A pen!”
Student: “A pen.”
Teacher: “A ruler!”
Student: “A ruler.”
Teacher: “A rubber!”
Student: “A rubber.”
Teacher: “A marker!”
Student: “A marker.”
The teacher reviews the objects.
Teacher: “Can you see? A pencil, a pen, a book, a rubber and a ruler! Good!”The teacher instructs the student to close his eyes. The teacher closes his eyes with hands so that the student can copy the gesture.
Teacher: “Now, close your eyes!”The teacher removes an object from the screen (click forward if you are using the AllRight slides in the classroom).
The teacher instructs the student to open his eyes and guess which object is missing using surprised intonation.
Teacher: “Open your eyes! What is missing?”
The teacher helps the student to guess if needed by pronouncing the first sound of the word:
Teacher: “P…p…pe…”
Student: “Pen!”
Teacher: “It is a pen!”
Student: “It is a pen!”

The teacher reveals the missing object (click forward if you are using the AllRight slides in the classroom).
The teacher repeats the procedure with all 5 words.

Notes: The game is often included in AllRight lessons in the classroom. In this case the teacher uses the interface of the slide.
The game can also be added to the lesson as an extra activity. In this case the game can be played with:

  • Real flashcards (the teacher needs to stick them to a whiteboard behind himself)
  • Toys or real objects (the objects can be placed on the table in front of the teacher)
  • Using digital images ( a. the teacher can use a powerpoint presentation to animate the objects appear and disappear; b. the teacher can use a picture with all 5 objects on it and put it to the online whiteboard in AllRight classroom; to imitate disappearing the teacher can draw upon an object he wants to close from the student and then click “back” to undo the drawing and reveal the object.
Listen and circle
Description: The student has to follow the teacher’s instructions and circle the object on the screen.
Instructions: The teacher selects 5 images of key vocabulary from the topic.
The teacher points to the objects and encourages the student to repeat after him, object by object.
Teacher: “Look! What’s this? A pencil!”
Student: “A pencil.”
Teacher: “A pen!”
Student: “A pen.”
Teacher: “A ruler!”
Student: “A ruler.”
Teacher: “A rubber!”
Student: “A rubber.”
Teacher: “A marker!”
Student: “A marker.”
The teacher encourages the student to listen and follow the instructions.
The teacher helps the student to find and click on the “pencil” tool in the classroom by drawing an arrow above the “pencil” tool on the toolbar in the classroom.
Teacher: Look! Take a pencil!The teacher names an object and the student circles in with the pencil tool in the classroom. To help the student understand what “circle” is, the teacher draws a circle in the air with his forefinger.
Teacher: Listen! Circle the pen! Circle the pen!
Student: *circles*
Teacher: A pen!
Student: A pen!
Teacher: It’s a pen!
Student: It’s a pen!
The teacher repeats the procedure with all 5 objects on the screen.

*For more advanced students, the game can be varied by asking the student to circle different objects with different colour:
Teacher: Circle the pen orange, please!
Student: *circles*
Teacher: A pen!
Student: A pen!
Teacher: An orange pen!
Student: An orange pen!
Teacher: It’s an orange pen!
Student: It’s an orange pen!

Notes: The game is often included in AllRight lessons in the classroom. In this case the teacher uses the interface of the classroom (the objects are already suggested on the slide and the student uses the pencil tool from the toolbar.

The game can also be added to the lesson as an extra activity. In this case the game can be played using a prepared digital image with 5 objects illustrating topical vocabulary. The teacher places the image on the online whiteboard in AllRight classroom; the student uses the “pencil” tool from the toolbar to draw.

Listen and draw
Description: The student has to listen to the teacher’s instructions and draw an object.
Can be done both on screen or on real paper.
Instructions: On screen:
The teacher explains to the student how to click on the pencil tool and choose a colour.
Teacher: Look! A pencil! Click! *draw an arrow above the button with the pencil to show the student where it is*
Student: *clicks on the pencil tool* OK!
Teacher: Let’s draw! I say, you draw! *draws a random line on the screen; points to his own mouth then points to the student and performs drawing*
Teacher: Draw a pencil! A pencil!
Teacher: Draw a book! A book!
On paper:
The teacher asks the student to prepare a piece of paper and a pencil or several crayons.
Teacher: Have you got paper? *show a piece of paper*
Teacher: Have you got a pencil? *show a pencil*
Teacher: Let’s draw! I say, you draw! *draws a random line on the screen; points to his own mouth then points to the student and performs drawing*
Teacher: Draw a pencil! A pencil!
Teacher: Draw a book! A book!
Notes: The game is often included in AllRight lessons in the classroom.
The game can be varied by adding a certain colour to the drawing instruction: “Draw a red pencil! A red pencil!”

▶️ Introduction to the lesson

  1. 💻System check
  2. 🎤Basic drills 1
  3. 🎵Song
  4. 🎤Basic drills 2
  5. 🎲Simple game

Maintaining a consistent lesson structure is very important as it provides the student with a reference point to feel comfortable and build confidence. Obviously over time the themes and content of lessons must change, however the structure, order and types of activity used should be repetitive in order to build familiarity with the process and what is coming next. A key element in building younger learners’ confidence is making ‘what comes next’ predictable; key to providing that familiarity is a modular structure of lesson.

▶️Introduction

Key to this approach is a regimented start to the lesson. The start to each lesson is a series of activities and/or exercises which draw the learner into ‘lesson mode’ and allow the teacher to help the learner establish focus.

The lesson introduction, like the opening title sequence of a TV series (think about the opening sequence of  “The Simpsons”) should be familiar, fun, energetic and remain unchanged lesson to lesson.

Key elements that could be included in the introduction:

  • System check
  • Basic drills 1
  • Visual prompts and gestures
  • Basic drills 2
  • A simple game

The introduction part of the lesson should last from 5-8 minutes long, and the segue between the elements should be clear and demonstrative.

1 min System check
The teacher comes to the classroom and checks whether the student is already there.

  • If the student hasn’t come yet, the teacher sees a picture saying “The student will join soon, please wait”. The timer isn’t counting the time.
  • If the student is already there, the timer of the lesson starts.
Phrase Gestures Instructions
Teacher: Hello? Can you see me? Can you hear me? Wave your hand, see the reaction of the student. The teacher makes sure that the student can hear and see him properly.
2 min Basic drills 1
Usually includes greeting each other, asking basic questions (already familiar for the student), yet the routine stays the same from lesson to lesson. Also this part may involve a lot of miming which serves both as prompts for the student and as an “ice-breaker”:
Phrase Gestures Instructions
Hi! Wave your hand actively and smile Encourage the student to repeat after you.
Student: Hi!
What’s your name?  Move palm towards student Give prompts if needed.
Insist on full answer:
Teacher:  Misha? Vasya? No? Denis! Good! Say “I’m Denis!” 
Engage the student to repeat
How are you? Draw your hands aside then point to the student. Insist on full answer:
Student: I’m good! / I’m fine, thank you! (this variant is normally taught at schools)
Give prompts and mime:
Help the student to choose the answer:
Teacher: Good? Good! Say “I’m good!”
Good? Thumbs up
Bad? Thumbs down
Sad? Rub your eyes
Draw your hands apart, then point to the student. Insist on full answer:
Student: Yes, I am! No, I’m not!
Are you happy? Smile and point to the corners of your mouth.
Are you sad? Make a sad face.
Are you hungry? Move your palm around your stomach.
How old are you? Draw your hands apart, then point to the student. Show numbers with your fingers. Insist on full answers. Engage the student to mime the numbers too.
Teacher: Five? Six? Seven? Seven! Say “I’m seven!”
What’s the weather like? Insist on full answers. Mime and give prompts if needed.
When a student says “yes” or “no” to any of the variants, involve him to say the complete phrase:
Student: It is hot/cold/windy!
Is it sunny? show the sun rays with your fingers by spreading them.
Is it rainy? show the raindrops falling from the sky with your fingers dropping down fast.
Is it windy? blow the air with your mouth
Is it cloudy? draw circles above your head with your fingers
Is it snowy? show the snow falling from the sky by drawing circles from up to down with your forefingers
Is it cold? shiver and embrace yourself
Is it hot? fan yourself with a palm
What day is it today? Insist on a full answer:
Student: It is Monday.
No need to learn all days of the week at this stage. Normally the students have their lessons in the same days of the week so after a couple of times they learn the correct answer.
2 min Song
It is good to use some standard song or chant to start a lesson. AllRight suggests our own basic hello-chant, which also serves for energizing the student, building the confidence in using basic structures, building the proper intonation and stress in speech.
1, 2, 3, GO!
Let’s – say – Hello!
x2All Right! (thumbs up)
How are you? (clapping 3 times)
x2
What’s your name?
I am Charlie!
What’s your name?
I am (teacher)
What’s your name?
I am (student) x2All Right! (thumbs up)
2 min Basic drills 2
To activate and actualize the student’s knowledge use quick quiz-like tasks to review the vocabulary. In case the student is still unfamiliar to a topic, give him/her prompts of the words, which sound similar in the student’s native language:

  • Counting (1,2,3,4,5 – clapping)
  • Animals (zebra, giraffe, tiger, crocodile)
  • Fruits (lemon, banana)
  • Colours (asking the student to show an object of a colour)
  • Set of questions // Lists // Challenges (topical)
Teacher Student Instructions
Count to 10! 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10! Mime the numbers with your fingers, engage the student to copy and say.
Show me something (red)! Red! Find an object of the colour yourself too and show in the camera. Engage the student to say the colour.
Name 3 animals! E.g. cat, dog, zebra, tiger, giraffe Give prompts if needed: mime the animals and engage a student to say. For complete beginners use the words which are usually familiar to everyone or sound the same in the student’s native language.
Name 2 fruit! E.g. lemon, banana Give prompts if needed and engage a student to say. For complete beginners use the words which are usually familiar to everyone or sound the same in the student’s native language.
Additional topical task
E.g. Show me 3 school things!
E.g. a pen, a pencil, a rubber If possible, use objects around you to give prompts and show them in the camera. Alternatively, you can use real or digital flashcards or even draw an object using paper or the whiteboard in the classroom to illustrate the idea.
1 min Simple game
This part enables you to come up to the material of the lesson and review the material of the previous one. Use simple games, such as “Mime and guess”, “What is missing? (with the cards)”, “Odd one out”, “Listen and draw”, etc.
The games can be:

  • on screen (in the slide or a screenshot on a whiteboard)
  • using real objects (cards in the hands of a teacher, drawing on paper, involving the toys and things around the student
  • verbal questions (linked to revision of the topic)

Here are some variants of games you can use. Choose 1-2 games.
The examples are given on the topic “School”:

What is missing?
Description: The student has to identify the card or image that has disappeared from the screen
Instructions: The teacher selects 5 images of key vocabulary from the topic.
The teacher points to the objects and encourages the student to repeat after him, object by object.
Teacher: “Look! What’s this? A pencil!”
Student: “A pencil.”
Teacher: “A pen!”
Student: “A pen.”
Teacher: “A ruler!”
Student: “A ruler.”
Teacher: “A rubber!”
Student: “A rubber.”
Teacher: “A marker!”
Student: “A marker.”
The teacher reviews the objects.
Teacher: “Can you see? A pencil, a pen, a book, a rubber and a ruler! Good!”The teacher instructs the student to close his eyes. The teacher closes his eyes with hands so that the student can copy the gesture.
Teacher: “Now, close your eyes!”The teacher removes an object from the screen (click forward if you are using the AllRight slides in the classroom).
The teacher instructs the student to open his eyes and guess which object is missing using surprised intonation.
Teacher: “Open your eyes! What is missing?”
The teacher helps the student to guess if needed by pronouncing the first sound of the word:
Teacher: “P…p…pe…”
Student: “Pen!”
Teacher: “It is a pen!”
Student: “It is a pen!”

The teacher reveals the missing object (click forward if you are using the AllRight slides in the classroom).
The teacher repeats the procedure with all 5 words.

Notes: The game is often included in AllRight lessons in the classroom. In this case the teacher uses the interface of the slide.
The game can also be added to the lesson as an extra activity. In this case the game can be played with:

  • Real flashcards (the teacher needs to stick them to a whiteboard behind himself)
  • Toys or real objects (the objects can be placed on the table in front of the teacher)
  • Using digital images ( a. the teacher can use a powerpoint presentation to animate the objects appear and disappear; b. the teacher can use a picture with all 5 objects on it and put it to the online whiteboard in AllRight classroom; to imitate disappearing the teacher can draw upon an object he wants to close from the student and then click “back” to undo the drawing and reveal the object.
Listen and circle
Description: The student has to follow the teacher’s instructions and circle the object on the screen.
Instructions: The teacher selects 5 images of key vocabulary from the topic.
The teacher points to the objects and encourages the student to repeat after him, object by object.
Teacher: “Look! What’s this? A pencil!”
Student: “A pencil.”
Teacher: “A pen!”
Student: “A pen.”
Teacher: “A ruler!”
Student: “A ruler.”
Teacher: “A rubber!”
Student: “A rubber.”
Teacher: “A marker!”
Student: “A marker.”
The teacher encourages the student to listen and follow the instructions.
The teacher helps the student to find and click on the “pencil” tool in the classroom by drawing an arrow above the “pencil” tool on the toolbar in the classroom.
Teacher: Look! Take a pencil!The teacher names an object and the student circles in with the pencil tool in the classroom. To help the student understand what “circle” is, the teacher draws a circle in the air with his forefinger.
Teacher: Listen! Circle the pen! Circle the pen!
Student: *circles*
Teacher: A pen!
Student: A pen!
Teacher: It’s a pen!
Student: It’s a pen!
The teacher repeats the procedure with all 5 objects on the screen.

*For more advanced students, the game can be varied by asking the student to circle different objects with different colour:
Teacher: Circle the pen orange, please!
Student: *circles*
Teacher: A pen!
Student: A pen!
Teacher: An orange pen!
Student: An orange pen!
Teacher: It’s an orange pen!
Student: It’s an orange pen!

Notes: The game is often included in AllRight lessons in the classroom. In this case the teacher uses the interface of the classroom (the objects are already suggested on the slide and the student uses the pencil tool from the toolbar.

The game can also be added to the lesson as an extra activity. In this case the game can be played using a prepared digital image with 5 objects illustrating topical vocabulary. The teacher places the image on the online whiteboard in AllRight classroom; the student uses the “pencil” tool from the toolbar to draw.

Listen and draw
Description: The student has to listen to the teacher’s instructions and draw an object.
Can be done both on screen or on real paper.
Instructions: On screen:
The teacher explains to the student how to click on the pencil tool and choose a colour.
Teacher: Look! A pencil! Click! *draw an arrow above the button with the pencil to show the student where it is*
Student: *clicks on the pencil tool* OK!
Teacher: Let’s draw! I say, you draw! *draws a random line on the screen; points to his own mouth then points to the student and performs drawing*
Teacher: Draw a pencil! A pencil!
Teacher: Draw a book! A book!
On paper:
The teacher asks the student to prepare a piece of paper and a pencil or several crayons.
Teacher: Have you got paper? *show a piece of paper*
Teacher: Have you got a pencil? *show a pencil*
Teacher: Let’s draw! I say, you draw! *draws a random line on the screen; points to his own mouth then points to the student and performs drawing*
Teacher: Draw a pencil! A pencil!
Teacher: Draw a book! A book!
Notes: The game is often included in AllRight lessons in the classroom.
The game can be varied by adding a certain colour to the drawing instruction: “Draw a red pencil! A red pencil!”